Travertine

Travertine is a natural stone such as Marble, Granite, Onyx, Limestone, Slate etc. The key difference between Travertine and other natural stones lies in the formation of the rock, the hardness of the stone and the appearance. Travertine is a form of limestone deposited by mineral springs, especially hot springs. Travertine often has a fibrous or concentric appearance and exists in white, tan, cream-colored, and even rusty varieties. It is formed by a process of rapid precipitation of calcium carbonate, often at the mouth of a hot spring or in a limestone cave. In the latter, it can form stalactites, stalagmites, and other speleothems. Travertine is often used as a building material. The Romans mined deposits of travertine for building temples, aqueducts, monuments, bath complexes, and amphitheaters such as the Colosseum, the largest building in the world constructed mostly of travertine.

“The construction of the Colosseum involved the draining of the lake constructed by Nero and was achieved due to a number of technical innovations in architecture and construction developed by the Romans. It used a number of construction materials to maximise their qualities, these were travertine, tufa, brickwork and cement.”

Travertine is often visibly porous, giving it a more natural, textured look. However, when sanded down and sealed, travertine tiles are smooth and suitable for flooring or as shower tiles. This stone is relatively soft and absorbent, so it requires a few coats of sealant to prevent debris from penetrating the stone. Travertine’s colors are typically warm and range from the lightest white or cream to beige, gold, brown, and even red. Slight color and pattern variations between tiles keep them from looking too uniform. This type of stone is also available in a variety of finishes, including polished, honed, brushed, saw cut, and tumbled.